Doing Good

September 14th, 2017

OCU will on September 24th experience the first, and long anticipated, “One Table 2017” event where we will serve dinner to 250 diverse people of our community in a meal symbolic of our having overcome the historical divides which have long separated our people. The dinner will take place on the John Ross Memorial Bridge in downtown Rome. This will celebrate the progress of our efforts to build bridges to bring all people together. Read the rest of this entry »

Flyin’ with the Wild Geese

September 5th, 2017

Unless you live under a rock, most days are lived with an undercurrent of stress and distress. When it seems the political charges and countercharges cannot get worse, we have the incident in Charlottesville and its aftermath. Surely people of faith will come together to actually love their neighbors. Yet too many refuse to acknowledge the prejudices they harbor in fear that the neighbor they claim to love might somehow be “different” and threatening.

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Heritage

August 29th, 2017

I have had a wonderful life. I never thought when growing up in the shadow of the cotton mill that I would ever see any sights beyond the land outside our personal large geographical circle which encompassed Rome, Texas Valley, and Moultrie. Rome has been my home for life. Texas Valley was the home of my father’s youth and Moultrie that of my mother. Read the rest of this entry »

Courage to Be: Revisited

August 14th, 2017

I miss living in the home of the brave; we Americans have become a fearful people. The news media on both sides of the political spectrum floods us with sensational scary stories so they can grow an audience to view ads for medicines. Politicians play to fears to win votes. It seems that a significant number of Americans are especially frightened by potential terrorist attacks and by people who don’t look, talk or believe like one of their particular tribe. Read the rest of this entry »

A truce for the culture wars?

July 10th, 2017

I recently re-watched the classic movie “Chariots of Fire.” Scottish missionary-to-be Eric Liddell is chosen to run in the 1924 summer Olympics. When he discovered that he must run a qualifying heat on Sunday, he refused. His religious belief was that running on Sunday would violate the commandment to “honor the Sabbath.” Even in 1924, Liddell’s decision and his beliefs were met with disbelief, criticism and confusion. What’s the big deal about running a race on Sunday? How quaint to have such an old-fashioned religious restriction.

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When heritage becomes baggage

June 12th, 2017

Two sides of the same coin. I don’t do the good things I want to do and I do the things I don’t want to do … Who am I? Each of us has a personal history that is a mixture of both good and bad. That history is our heritage. We did not choose our heritage; it was given to us. We celebrate the good things in our heritage and drag the bad through our lives like overweight baggage.

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Summer beach reading: Articles and book chapters

June 5th, 2017

Memorial Day Weekend requires selection of the summer’s reading list. Books are shelved this year for essays and articles from the past and present; all are easily accessed on the web. Pick and choose as you will. You are relieved of worry about Attention Deficit Disorder; but comprehension and retention could still be a challenge.

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Where is the middle of this road anyway?

May 22nd, 2017

“Clowns to the left of me, jokers to the right, here I am stuck in the middle with you.” The band was Stealers Wheel, the year was 1972. Maybe the song should be re-released in the angry, divisive cultural scene of 2017.

In June, 2015, the US Supreme Court ruled that gay marriage is legal in all 50 states. The response was swift and vocal from both sides of the issue. My Facebook “lit up” and I was troubled by what I read.

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Healthcare plan or tax cut?

May 15th, 2017

“… Think ye that building shall endure which shelters the noble and crushes the poor?”

from “A Parable,” by American Poet James Russell Lowell

“Overall, the plan would boost the number of uninsured and shift federal assistance away from some of the most vulnerable people in this nation, while cutting taxes for the richest.” So Dr. Henry Aaron, healthcare analyst at the Brookings Institute, summarizes the consequences of the Republican American Health Care Act. 

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Jimmy Kimmel leads the way on health care reform

May 8th, 2017

“If your baby is going to die, and it doesn’t have to, it shouldn’t matter how much money you make. I think that’s something that, whether you’re a Republican or a Democrat or something else, we all agree on that, right?”
Jimmy Kimmel

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